I Nailed It!

You may know that I enjoy woodworking. I’ve been taking some time to learn more about traditional ways including joinery and hardware that was used throughout the 18th and 19th centuries (and likely earlier except records or publications from that time are hard to find). Excitedly so, I have found several books, magazines and “YouTubers” that practice these techniques and provide excellent information about them.

One of my favorite ways of joining boards is using cut nails (one style pictured below). They certainly are old fashioned but I’m here to tell you that if you ever have to pull an errant or bent one out – be prepared. These nails have significantly more holding strength than today’s wire nails. And with their wedge shape you almost always have to drill a pilot hole and watch the nail’s orientation to avoid splitting the wood when joining near the edges of boards. Wrought iron and rosehead are styles that are very attractive in the finished product.

You can find cut nails in places like eBay and Etsy but they can be expensive depending on the type. Tremont Nails (tremontnail.com) up in Massachusetts is the of the oldest existing manufacturers of cut nails and still uses some of the original equipment to produce them. So if you’re making heirloom boxes, crates, desks, bookcases, etc. and want that “antique” look, give cut nails a try. And yes, you can still use glue!

One of the techniques described in various placees is “clinching” which is not new to anybody but can be very effective in holding two pieces of wood together. What’s most commonly seen – that of driving the nail through two boards and then simply hammering the excess flat to the underside is not really correct. Sure it works but it could be even more effective. There’s an extra step that’s almost never used today – that of hammering the end to an angle before hammering it back into the underside. (You might ask, “do I ever use screws instead of nails?” Sure, pocket hole joinery that uses screws is as old as the hills and I use them in places that are hidden.)

Finally, I’m enjoying a book, “The Joiner and Cabinet Maker,” that was originally published in 1839. It’s in current production by Lost Art Press (in Kentucky) but has a wonderful chapter on the history of nails. Growing up in Indiana farm country I would often be asked to fetch a 6- or 8-penny nail but never gave it any thought as why “penny” was used to describe a nail nor what the relationship was to length. This book put it all together for me and below is a copy of the page that’s most informative.

So that’s it on nails and nailing. Frankly, I think I nailed it.

I want y’all to do well. ~PH

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